From tropics to tundra: A Queen Elizabeth Scholar’s tale

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By Marina Melanidis

If someone had told me when I was about to start the first year of my undergraduate degree at UBC that I would have conducted research in India and explored the Arctic on an ocean liner before I even graduated, I wouldn’t have believed them. The transition from my local secondary school to UBC’s size-of-a-small-town campus was exciting but it was also overwhelming, and amongst so many inspiring people and incredible opportunities I was stricken with a fear of not being good enough. I could hardly imagine classes of 200 people, much less places thousands of kilometers away.

I can definitely imagine both of those now.

My name is Marina Melanidis. I was born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, where I am also currently pursuing a BSc in Natural Resources Conservation in the Faculty of Forestry as a senior undergraduate student at UBC. During the second year of my degree, I was fortunate enough to receive an opportunity to intern at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) as a Forestry co-op student through the Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship Program (QES). QES is managed through a unique partnership of Universities Canada, the Rideau Hall Foundation (RHF), Community Foundations of Canada (CFC) and Canadian universities, and is made possible with financial support from the Government of Canada, provincial governments and the private sector.

UBC student Marina Melanidis was a forestry intern at the Wildlife Institute of India through the QES program.

I spent three and a half months in India in the summer of 2015. For the first five weeks I took a field course, and I interned with WII for the rest of the summer. I was wildly outside of my comfort zone. I had never been away from home without my family, and I had never experienced a place so different from where I had grown up. To say that I was hit by culture shock would be an understatement. For the first time I found myself unable to understand the language of the majority of people around me. Crowds were the norm instead of something only expected during special events, and monkeys were a hazard to be considered when hanging laundry to dry outside. I was hesitant and unsure, but I also found myself captivated by the vividness of the colours and by the people that were as diverse as the landscape.

But India was not the end of my adventures as a Queen Elizabeth Scholar. In January of 2017 the Faculty of Forestry at UBC notified me about an opportunity from Community Foundations of Canada to participate in the 2017 Students on Ice Arctic Expedition as a QES alumnus. I sent in my application, and the next thing I knew I was on a plane to Resolute Bay, Nunavut for the experience of a lifetime, for a second time.

Students on Ice is an educational foundation that gives youth the opportunity to experience the poles. On the 2017 Arctic Expedition, I was one of over 120 secondary school and university students that traveled from Resolute Bay, Nunuvat to Kangralassuit Greenland via the MS Ocean Endeavour, stopping along the way to participate in educational workshops, go on hikes and Zodiac cruises, and explore the landscape. More than 80 experts joined us on the expedition from every field, including scientists, musicians, Inuit community leaders, industry executives, artists, and explorers. They shared their knowledge with us through workshops, as well as through casual conversations that would occur over meals, on Zodiacs, and during hikes. The expedition was two weeks long, but contained months worth of learning and growth. Every day was a new incredible landscape and I was overwhelmed and inspired all at once.

India and the Arctic may seem like opposites at first glance, but I left the two with the same impression: climate change is about people, and connection is necessary for understanding.

I am a science student. While my degree is multidisciplinary, I had always thought about my interest in climate change and my passion for conservation from a scientific perspective. I had operated under the idea that humans and the environment can be separated, and that focusing on the scientific and technological aspects of the climate crisis is the most effective way to address it. I approached my experiences in both India and the Arctic with this perspective. I was excited to see the ecological landscapes of both places and to understand how mass extinction, pollution, increasing temperatures, and changing weather patterns are affecting the various ecosystems. While the cultures of India and the Arctic interested me, it was not the driving force motivating me to embark on these adventures. Ultimately, I was there for the science.

As a QES alumnus, Marina had the opportunity to join the 2017 Students on Ice Arctic Expedition with more than 120 high school and university students.

However, when I found myself back home after both experiences the impressions from the landscapes and the ecosystems are not what lingered – instead it was the people. I now realize that my entire perspective was based on a false assumption. Humans and the environment, climate change and culture – these things are inherently connected. Climate change is human, and we cannot hope to address it effectively without first fully understanding that, and implementing it into our solutions.

While understanding may be necessary to develop effective solutions, connection is necessary to foster understanding. This is what traveling allows for – it reduces the cognitive distance of a place by building real and personal connections to that place. As a QE Scholar, I developed a stronger connection to the world, to the people that live on it, and even to myself. Both experiences offered moments where I had to push through fears and uncertainty, but it was often in those moments where I felt the most connected to the people around me and the world we are all fighting for.

Climate change is a global problem – it has impacts that reach across borders, and it requires solutions that will do the same. As a Queen Elizabeth Scholar, I can no longer go through my life being satisfied with staying in one place. I can no longer be satisfied with being comfortable. I have a new drive to keep expanding my horizons, pushing past my fears to make connections in other places, and to keep discovering the human causes of climate change so that I can help find solutions. Moving forward, I plan to travel, pursue a graduate degree in international environmental policy, and work with communities to develop programs that will reduce our global environmental footprint in ways that work for people. Most importantly, I plan to continue to challenge myself and my perspective on the world, and to take the energy of India and the Arctic everywhere I go.

Geoff Green, the Expedition Leader and Founder of Students on Ice, said this to us during one of the afternoon programs: “The future of great explorers are those that find new ways of living sustainably.”

I plan to be a great explorer.

 

Learn more:

Students on Ice

Queen Elizabeth Scholars tagboard

UBC Forestry Co-op Program

 

New Call for Proposals

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Following very successful QES calls for proposals in 2014 and 2016, Universities Canada, the Rideau Hall Foundation, and Community Foundations of Canada are pleased to announce that a third call for proposals is being launched today.

The Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarships program (QES) was created to improve global talent exchange between Canada and other nations. The program aims to develop the next generation of innovative leaders and community builders by providing enriched academic, professional and cross-cultural experiences and by facilitating lasting local and global community engagement. There are currently 71 projects being administered by 42 Canadian universities and with over 1000 scholarships already awarded.

2017 Competition
Canadian universities are invited to submit multi-year project proposals seeking funding of up to $300,000 CAD for projects of up to four years. Each Canadian university may submit one proposal to the 2017 competition. Approximately $6 million CAD will available through this competition.

Projects will support international internships for Canadian students and/or scholarships for incoming international graduate students. The program will require all scholars to participate in leadership development and community engagement activities and in the network of Queen Elizabeth Scholars.

Please consult the following documents:

Program Guidelines

Application form

Frequently Asked Questions

If you have any questions, please contact Jeanne Gallagher, Manager, International Scholarships at  QES2017@univcan.ca. The FAQ section will be updated on a weekly basis.

Next generation research leaders from Canada and low- and middle-income countries to pursue innovation and community-building projects

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Researcher presents chart

OTTAWA – More than 450 researchers at the doctoral, postdoctoral and early-career levels will undertake global research projects as part of the new Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholars Program, contributing to improved global talent exchange between Canada and other nations.

This expanded second round of the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program will fund winning projects at 23 Canadian universities, thanks to a $10 million contribution by Canada’s International Development Research Centre and a $2.5 million contribution from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. This additional funding has allowed the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program to expand its reach to more low- and middle-income countries, and fund researchers at multiple stages of their careers to become the next generation of innovative leaders and community builders.

For a complete list of the winning proposals, please visit www.queenelizabethscholars.ca/winning-proposals. Details of the Queen Elizabeth Scholars’ travel and research are also shared on the #QEScholars tagboard.

The winning projects span diverse subject areas ranging from agriculture and food security to climate change, employment and growth, and maternal and child health. Successful projects were selected by an independent selection committee representing research and funding communities from around the world.

The Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholars Program is managed through a unique partnership between Universities Canada, the Rideau Hall Foundation, Community Foundations of Canada and Canadian universities. It is made possible with financial support from the International Development Research Centre and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

 

 

About Queen Elizabeth Scholars Program

The Queen Elizabeth Scholars program aims to activate a dynamic community of young global leaders across Canada and the Commonwealth to create lasting impacts both at home and abroad through cross-cultural exchanges encompassing international education, discovery and inquiry, and professional experiences. To learn more visit www.queenelizabethscholars.ca.

About Universities Canada

Universities Canada is the voice of Canada’s universities at home and abroad, representing the interests of 97 Canadian public and private not-for-profit universities. To learn more visit www.univcan.ca.

About Community Foundations of Canada

Community Foundations of Canada is the national network for Canada’s 191 community foundations. We are a philanthropic movement working across sectors to help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient communities. To learn more visit www.communityfoundations.ca.

About Rideau Hall Foundation

The Rideau Hall Foundation works in close collaboration with the Office of the Governor General and many external partners to support initiatives that strengthen our national identity, build capacity and promote the advancement of a smart and caring nation through learning, leadership, innovation and giving initiatives. To learn more visit www.rhf-frh.ca.

About International Development Research Centre

Part of Canada’s foreign affairs and development efforts, IDRC invests in knowledge, innovation, and solutions to improve lives and livelihoods in the developing world. Bringing together the right partners around opportunities for impact, IDRC builds leaders for today and tomorrow and helps drive large-scale positive change. Learn more at www.idrc.ca.

About Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada is the federal research funding agency that promotes and supports postsecondary research and research training in the humanities and social sciences. By focusing on developing talent, generating insights and forging connections across campuses and communities, SSHRC supports world-leading initiatives that reflect a commitment to a better future for Canada and the world. To learn more visit: www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca

 

Media Contacts:

Universities Canada
Brenna Baggs
Communications manager
Tel.: (613) 563-3961 ext. 255
bbaggs@univcan.ca
Twitter: @UnivCan @QEScholars

Community Foundations of Canada
David Venn
Director of communications
Tel: (613) 236-2664 ext. 302
dvenn@communityfoundations.ca
Twitter: @CommFdnsCanada

Rideau Hall Foundation
Melanie Bechard
Communications officer
Tel: (613) 914-0651
melanie.bechard@rhf-frh.ca
Twitter: @RideauHallFdn

International Development Research Centre
Ghislain Desjardins
Senior media relations advisor
Tel: (613) 696-2177
Gdesjardins@idrc.ca
Twitter: @IDRC_CRDI

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council
Yoan St-Onge
Communications Advisor
Tel: (613) 947-6560
yoan.st-onge@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca
Twitter: @SSHRC_CRSH

Queen Elizabeth Advanced Scholars Program Winning Proposals

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See below the complete list of the winning proposals for the Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Advanced Scholars Program.

University

Project Title

University of Alberta Coming Together – Strengthening Partnerships between Ghana and Canada to Address Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health
University of Calgary QES-Advanced Scholars (International Development)
Carleton University Societal Transformation and Climate Change: Training the next generation of scholars in Sub-Sahara Africa (NextGen Climate Change Advanced Scholars)
Lakehead University Agrobiodiversity, Nutrition and Sustainable Marketing of Heritage Crops in Ecuador and Canada
Laurentian University Science, Technology, and Innovation: Capacity Building for Sustainable growth throughout the Mining Life Cycle
Wilfrid Laurier University Building Capacity in Urban Food System Governance in LMIC Cities
McGill University A network of interdisciplinary, solution-oriented researchers to improve the livelihoods and food and nutrition security of adolescent girls and women farmers in rural Ghana
Université de Moncton Développement des “leaders” pour une meilleure nutrition des filles et des femmes, un incontournable pour le mieux-être des populations d’Afrique de l’Ouest et Centrale
Université de Montréal Bourses de recherche destinées aux chercheurs doctoraux, post-doctoraux et en début carrière du Canada et de Chine dans les domaines du droit et de la santé
University of Ottawa The Open African Innovation Research Partnership (Open AIR): New and Emerging Researcher Fellowship Program
Queen’s University QE Scholars Network for Equity in Maternal and Child Health
University of Regina University of Regina Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Program for Advanced Scholars: Innovative Approaches to Climate Change
Ryerson University Strengthening Coastal Aquifer Resilience and Groundwater Use Against Climate Change Effects in the Caribbean
University of Saskatchewan Global Leaders Scholarship – Seeking Sustainable Solutions in Food Security and Nutrition for Women and Children: A Tri-Country Approach
Simon Fraser University Providing Sustainable Potable Water and Greenhouse Crops
University of Toronto The Statistical Alliance for Vital Events (SAVE) Queen Elizabeth Scholarship-Advanced Scholars Program (SAVE-QES)
University of New Brunswick Entrepreneurship Education and Training for Canada, India, china and Ghana
Université du Québec en Outaouais Partenariat pour l’amélioration de la santé maternelle et infantile en Afrique de l’Ouest à l’aide de la santé numérique
Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières Formation de doctorants de l’Institut national de formation d’action sanitaire et sociale (INFASS) en santé maternelle et infantile
University of Victoria Regulating Globalization in South and Southeast Asia
University of Waterloo Water Security as a Foundation for Healthy Communities and Sustainable Livelihoods
University of Winnipeg The University of Winnipeg Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee International Scholars Program
York University Ecological Economics, Commons Governance, and Climate Justice

Read the full media release here.

Call for proposals launched for expanded Queen Elizabeth Scholars program

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(OTTAWA, ON) October 6, 2016 – The Queen Elizabeth Scholars program is expanding, allowing more advanced scholars to benefit from the life-changing global experiences that the program offers. Universities Canada launched a call today to universities from across the country to submit new project proposals by November 25, 2016.

Contributions from Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) led to the $12.5 million expansion of the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program. Created to improve global talent exchange between Canada and other nations, the program helps develop the next generation of innovative leaders and community builders by providing enriched academic, professional and cross-cultural experiences and by facilitating lasting local and global community engagement.

“Extending the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program to include early career researchers reflects the growing significance of the program as a platform for international engagement and grows Canada’s global footprint,” says Paul Davidson, President and CEO of Universities Canada. “The first cohort of Queen Elizabeth Scholars is an impressive group, and this next phase hold great promise. I look forward to seeing how they’ll contribute to building a more innovative, prosperous and inclusive Canada.”

Participating scholars will have access to the advanced education, training and mentorship vital to cutting-edge innovation. They will engage in local development with industry, government, and civil society organizations.

“We are delighted that IDRC’s $10 million contribution will expand the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program to provide new learning opportunities for doctoral, post-doctoral, and early career scientists from low- and middle-income countries, as well as in Canada,” says Jean Lebel, President of the International Development Research Centre. “These students will become the leaders of tomorrow who will influence the change that will improve the lives of people throughout the world.”

“SSHRC is proud to be partnering on the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program to give students additional research and training opportunities in the humanities and social sciences, such as working with Indigenous communities across the world,” says Ted Hewitt, President of SSHRC. “The program will contribute to build and sustain a strong research environment, here and abroad, preparing students to succeed within and beyond academia.”

“We are delighted to support the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program, which helps young Canadians across the country grow as leaders and global citizens through their enriched experiences,” says Scott Haldane, Rideau Hall Foundation President and CEO. “It is through leading programs such as this one that Canada will make advancements as a nation in the key areas of learning, leading and innovation.”

“Globalization has had a profound impact on how we share ideas and engage in our communities. The expansion of the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program will provide even more opportunities for a global exchange of talent, and is a prime example of leadership coming together from all sectors and all over the world to have impact,” says Andrew Chunilall, Chief Operating Officer with Community Foundations of Canada. “This call will invite a new wave of activation between community foundations and local universities as we continue to explore ways to connect our communities with others globally.”

The Queen Elizabeth Scholars program is managed through a unique partnership of Universities Canada, Rideau Hall Foundation, Community Foundations of Canada, and Canadian universities. It was first introduced by the Governor General of Canada David Johnston and former Prime Ministers Stephen Harper and Jean Chrétien. There are currently more than 500 Queen Elizabeth Scholars from 36 Canadian universities across the country.

 

www.univcan.ca/programs-and-scholarships/queen-elizabeth-scholars

 

 

About Universities Canada

Universities Canada is the voice of Canada’s universities at home and abroad, representing the interests of 97 Canadian public and private not-for-profit universities.

About International Development Research Centre

Part of Canada’s foreign affairs and development efforts, IDRC invests in knowledge, innovation, and solutions to improve lives and livelihoods in the developing world. Bringing together the right partners around opportunities for impact, IDRC builds leaders for today and tomorrow and helps drive large-scale positive change.

About Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council is a separate agency of the Government of Canada founded in 1977 and mandated to promote and support postsecondary-based research and training in social sciences and the humanities. Through grants, fellowships and scholarships, SSHRC helps Canada’s researchers and research institutions do what they do best: train the next generation of talented, creative thinkers and doers; build knowledge and understanding about people, cultures and societies; and drive the innovations that address the challenges of today and tomorrow.

About Rideau Hall Foundation

Rideau Hall Foundation gathers, aligns and catalyzes ideas, people and resources to move the Canadian spirit and our shared aspirations forward. As an independent, non-political charitable organization, it works collaboratively with the Office of the Governor General and many multi-sectoral partners to promote the advancement of a smart and caring nation in the priority areas of learning, leadership, innovation and giving.

About Community Foundations of Canada

Community Foundations of Canada is the national network for Canada’s 191 community foundations. Together we are a philanthropic movement working across sectors to help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient communities.

Media Contacts:

Universities Canada
Nadine Robitaille
Communications Officer
Tel: (613) 563-3961 ext. 306
Email: nrobitaille@univcan.ca
Twitter: @UnivCan

International Development Research Centre
Dominique Guerin-Garnett
Senior Public Affairs Advisor
Tel: (613) 696-2075
Email: media@idrc.ca
Twitter: @IDRC_CDRI

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Yoan St-Onge
Communications Advisor
Tel:(613) 947-6560
Email:Yoan St-Onge@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca
Twitter: @SSHRC_CRSH

Rideau Hall Foundation
Teresa Marques
Director, Strategic Partnerships
Tel: (613) 914-0217
Email: teresa.marques@rhf-frh.ca
Twitter: @QEScholars

Community Foundations of Canada
David Venn
Director of Communications
Tel: (613) 236-2664 ext. 302
Email: dvenn@communityfoundations.ca
Twitter: @CommFdnsCanada

IDRC contribution expands scope and reach of Queen Elizabeth Scholars program

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(OTTAWA, ON) June 2, 2016 – A new $10 million contribution from the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is helping to expand the scope and reach of the Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarships program. The funding from IDRC will offer new learning opportunities for doctoral, post-doctoral and early career researchers from low- and middle-income countries, as well as in Canada, seeking to enrich their academic, professional and cross-cultural experiences.

The Queen Elizabeth Scholars program (QES) is a collaborative initiative led by the Rideau Hall Foundation, Community Foundations of Canada and Universities Canada, with contributions from the Government of Canada, Canadian universities, and a wide range of partners from all sectors. Launched in 2014, the QES program has engaged 37 universities in every Canadian province and 85% of the Commonwealth. The first phase of the program will offer approximately 2,000 scholarships over four years and build a community of young leaders through a global exchange of talent.

The expansion of the QES program will provide a unique two-way exchange: researchers in low- and middle-income countries will have greater access to the advanced education, training and mentorship that are vital to cutting-edge innovation; and doctoral students and early career researchers in Canada will gain more exposure to the international experience they need to become leaders in globally competitive work environments. Another distinctive feature of the program will be direct opportunities for recipients to engage with key stakeholders in local development, including industry.

The QES program targets a 50 per cent gender balance of female and male students and ensures that gender equality is incorporated into all aspects of project activities, reporting and planning.

“IDRC is delighted to join the Rideau Hall Foundation, Community Foundations of Canada and Universities Canada in supporting the leaders of tomorrow who will develop solutions to increasingly complex national and global challenges,” said Jean Lebel, President, IDRC. “Through their applied research, innovations and collaboration, they will contribute to stronger economies, more prosperous societies and large-scale positive change.”

”IDRC’s substantial support is great news for the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program,” said Scott Haldane, President and CEO of the Rideau Hall Foundation. ”This contribution helps build momentum and attract additional resources that will enable even more students to experience this unique global talent exchange.”

“The Queen Elizabeth Scholars program offers young people invaluable international study and research experiences that will benefit them throughout their careers and lives,” said Paul Davidson, President of Universities Canada. “This significant contribution from IDRC will help develop the next generation of innovative leaders and community builders in Canada and around the world.”

“By providing opportunities for young scholars to experience different cultures and learn from one another through this global exchange of talent, we’re creating the conditions for our communities and countries to be more welcoming and inclusive,” said Ian Bird, President, Community Foundations of Canada. “IDRC’s contribution will give the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program an even greater lift, creating new opportunities for young leaders to make a lasting impact at home and abroad.”

IDRC contribution expands scope and reach of QES program Photo credit: MCpl Vincent Carbonneau, Rideau Hall ©OSGG (2016)

Jean Lebel and Scott Haldane discussing with Queen Elizabeth Scholars.

Photo: MCpl Vincent Carbonneau, Rideau Hall ©OSGG (2016)

 

About International Development Research Centre

Part of Canada’s foreign affairs and development efforts, IDRC invests in knowledge, innovation, and solutions to improve lives and livelihoods in the developing world. Bringing together the right partners around opportunities for impact, IDRC builds leaders for today and tomorrow and helps drive large-scale positive change. Learn more at www.idrc.ca.

About Queen Elizabeth Scholars program

The Canadian Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarships program aims to activate a dynamic community of young global leaders across Canada and around the world to create lasting impacts both at home and abroad through cross-cultural exchanges encompassing international education, discovery and inquiry, and professional experiences. To learn more visit, www.queenelizabethscholars.ca.

About Rideau Hall Foundation

The Rideau Hall Foundation gathers, aligns and catalyzes ideas, people and resources to move the Canadian spirit and our shared aspirations forward. As an independent, non-political charity, the Foundation works closely with the Governor General and many external partners to support initiatives that build our identity, build capacity and promote the advancement of a caring nation through learning, leadership, innovation and giving initiatives. To learn more about its initiatives, visit www.rhf-frh.ca.

About Universities Canada

Universities Canada is the voice of Canada’s universities at home and abroad, representing the interests of 97 Canadian public and private not-for-profit universities. To learn more visit www.univcan.ca.

About Community Foundations of Canada

Community Foundations of Canada is the national network for Canada’s 191 community foundations which help Canadians invest in building strong and resilient places to live, work, and play. To learn more visit www.communityfoundations.ca.

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Media Contacts:

International Development Research Centre
Jocelyn Sweet
Media Relations
Tel: (613) 696-2117
Email: media@idrc.ca
Twitter: @IDRC_CDRI

Rideau Hall Foundation
Pascale Montminy
Portfolio Manager
Tel: (613) 914-0501
Email: pascale.montminy@rhf-frh.ca
Twitter: @QEScholars

Universities Canada
Helen Murphy
Director, Communications
Tel: (613) 563-3961 ext. 238
Email: hmurphy@univcan.ca
Twitter: @UnivCan

Community Foundations of Canada
David Venn
Director of Communications
Tel: (613) 236-2664 ext. 302
Email: dvenn@communityfoundations.ca
Twitter: @CommFdnsCanada

Queen Elizabeth scholars to participate in African health improvement projects

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This article was originally posted by the University of Calgary on May 6, 2016 and is reposted with permission.

By Gillian Galambos

Excitement and nerves fill the room as the latest University of Calgary Queen Elizabeth scholars prepare to embark on an experience of a lifetime this summer.

Kevin Capuno, Sydney Krill, Sahar Khajeali and Zeeyaan Somani are the most recent recipients of the prestigious Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarship (QES). All undergraduate students from the faculties of arts and nursing, they are looking forward to having the opportunity to immerse themselves in local culture and to make a real difference in the communities they’ll be working in.

The objective of the QES program is to activate a dynamic community of young global leaders across the Commonwealth countries to create lasting impact — both locally and globally — through cross-cultural exchanges. Established in 2014, the University of Calgary sent the first group of Queen Elizabeth scholars abroad last year. The program continues to grow with the introduction of a new partnership with Aga Khan University in Uganda. These programs complement the internship opportunities available through the Study Abroad office thanks to our long-standing partnerships in the region.

Work in Africa will focus on maternal health, disabilities

Capuno and Krill are students in the Faculty of Arts, both taking combined degrees with a focus on development. They are headed to Ghana along with four other University of Calgary students funded by University of Calgary International to work with the Community Based Rehabilitation Program (CBR). They will be travelling to different rural field offices to work on improving the lives of those with disabilities. Khajeali and Somani are both in the Faculty of Nursing and are the first students to do an exchange with Aga Khan University. They’ll be working in a hospital focusing on maternal health in a developing country.

“I just want to be a sponge,” says Somani, when asked what she hopes to achieve during her internship. “I want to be immersed in the culture and learn everything I can, while developing relationships with the locals so I can relate to them on a more personal level.”

An opportunity to globalize degrees

The QES program closely aligns with the University of Calgary’s International Strategy and will have significant impact in Canada and around the world in creating a new global network of scholars. The QES program is managed through a unique partnership of Universities Canada, the Rideau Hall Foundation (RHF), Community Foundations of Canada (CFC) and Canadian universities. It’s made possible with financial support from the Government of Canada, provincial governments and the private sector.

“This program is a great opportunity for our students to gain international development experience and share knowledge between countries and institutions,” says Janaka Ruwanpura, vice-provost (international). “It really enables our students to become global citizens.”

The students will be overseas for 90 days completing their internships along with a self-directed course for academic credit. When they return home, they’ll be working to educate the campus community on their experiences and how other students can get involved.

Putting classroom theory into practice

“I want to empower people to make change,” says Krill. “I’m hoping that through this experience, I’ll learn practical skills in the field that I can bring back and use to teach others how to make the world a better place.”

Learn more about the QES program and apply for various study abroad opportunities.

Windsor Star Article: Queen Elizabeth II Scholars Program

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This article was originally posted in the Windsor Star on May 7, 2016 and is reposted with permission.

The Queen Elizabeth II Scholars (QES) Program is an innovative program for students with an interest in palliative care, and is managed through a valuable partnership between Universities Canada, the Rideau Hall Foundation (RHF), Community Foundations of Canada (CFC) and Canadian universities.

Samantha Kellam, a Masters student at the University of Windsor, was the first recipient of the scholarship and journeyed to England in January of this year to further her studies at Keele University. While at Keele, she has worked at two hospices – at Donna Louise Children’s Hospice and at Douglas Macmillan Hospice.

“Samantha was one of our undergrad students and she was also a Lancer,” says Dr. Kathy Pfa , an assistant professor in the Faculty of Nursing. “When she applied for this, it was clear she was the most stellar.”

Kellam committed to at least 90 days – a full semester – at Keele. The area of research she decided to undertake was in reflection, a practice commonly exercised in England but less frequently here.

“The health care team in hospice there fully reflect at the end of their work day,” explains assistant professor Dr. Laurie Freeman-Gibb. “She’s studying the benefi ts of reflection – how that impacts a team, or the individual.

“That’s typically not something we see here in Canada, and she wants to understand that. That’s the benefit of these programs – to learn from them what they do there that we don’t do here, and vice versa. It’s all about improving care.”

Students interested in applying for a scholarship to Keele University in England must meet the following requirements: scholars must enrolled in a Master’s or doctoral program in a health science or related field at the University of Windsor, while interns must be enrolled in an Honours undergraduate health science program at the University of Windsor and must travel to Keele University in the spring or summer between the third and fourth year of their undergraduate program. All applicants must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents and 35 years of age or under at the time of application.

All other requirements can be found at: http://www.uwindsor. ca/nursing/386/queen-elizabeth-ii-scholars-program For more information, please contact: · Dr. Kathy Pfa –519.253.3000, x4977 or kpfa @uwindsor. ca, or · Dr. Laurie Freeman-Gibb –519.253.3000, x2278 or lgibb@uwindsor.ca ILLUS: / Samantha Kellam; / Dr. Kathy Pfaff; / Dr. Laurie Freeman-Gibb;

The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Scholarships Program – Spring 2016 Update

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Photo from the Spring 2016 update

By mobilizing a community of young, dynamic Canadians to study abroad and by supporting students from other countries to attend Canadian universities, the Queen Elizabeth Scholars program is having significant impacts in Canada and around the world and creating a new global network of scholars. It is a worthy tribute to Her Majesty, who was pleased to lend her name to the program.

Queen Elizabeth Scholars – Spring 2016 Update